Since the inception of the Stuart Scott Memorial Cancer Research Fund, the V Foundation awards grants that support minority researchers and research that addresses the biological basis of cancer disparities. Translational Grants and Designated Grants that fund research on cancer types that disproportionately affect minority populations, including research on the biological basis of cancer disparities experienced by patients specifically from minority populations. Research is dedicated to the aggressiveness, therapeutic responsiveness, and ultimate outcomes experienced by cancer patients from diverse ethnic populations. 


The Fund also supports V Scholar Grants, awarded to scientists from minority populations who are presently underrepresented in science. This gives these researchers important, early-career funding to establish their labs and begin their careers as cancer researchers. 


To date, the V Foundation has awarded nearly $15 million in research grants from combined funds raised through ESPN, Inc. and other generous donors and partners. Our goal is to bring resolution to inequities in the cancer space. Your support will accelerate cutting-edge research, help experts diagnose cancer earlier and treat it more effectively, and fuel our commitment to inclusion which helps us close the gap, unconscious bias and disparities in our work to end cancer.

FEATURED SPEAKERS

FEATURED SPEAKERS

Bill Nelson, M.D.
Johns Hopkins Medicine Logo
Johns Hopkins Medicine Logo

WILLIAM G. NELSON, M.D., PH.D. | EPICUREAN SYMPOSIUM OVERVIEW

Chair of the V Foundation’s Scientific Advisory Committee
Marion I. Knott Professor of Oncology and Director of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins

Nancy Davidson, M.D.
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Logo
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Logo

NANCY E. DAVIDSON, M.D. | THE ROLE OF HORMONES IN BREAST CANCER HEALTH

President & Executive Director, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Senior Vice President and Member, Clinical Research Division; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Head, Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Washington
Raisbeck Endowed Chair for Collaborative Cancer Research

Breast cancer is often a hormonally mediated illness. Our ability to prevent and treat breast cancer has been greatly enhanced by laboratory discoveries about estrogen signaling pathways as well as careful epidemiological research to tease out risk factors for development of breast cancer. Research on how these pathways may go awry in breast cancer has led to the development of strategies to circumvent these abnormalities to better prevent or treat many people with breast cancer.
Shruti Naik, Ph.D.
NYU_Langone_Health_Logo
NYU_Langone_Health_Logo

SHRUTI NAIK, PH.D. |THE JEKYLL AND HYDE FUNCTION OF IMMUNITY IN CANCER

Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology Perlmutter Cancer Center

Our immune system has surfaced as a powerful weapon against cancer. Paradoxically, immune factors are also known to play a role in cancer development and progress. I discuss these opposing-roles of immunity and highlight how fundamental research performed in laboratories revolutionized cancer therapies. I also review current paradigms on how environmental factors (microbes, nutrients etc.) modulate inflammation and can be leveraged to boost immune health. 

Otis Webb Brawley, M.D.
Johns Hopkins University Logo
Johns Hopkins University Logo

OTIS W. BRAWLEY, M.D. | CANCER HEALTH DISPARITIES

Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Oncology and Epidemiology Johns Hopkins University
Interdisciplinary research of cancer health disparities working to close racial, economic, and social disparities in the prevention, detection, and treatment of cancer in the United States and worldwide. Cancer can be a completely different experience for people who are Black, and the outcomes show Black and African American people in the U.S. have the highest cancer mortality and shortest survival rate of any racial or ethnic group.